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Wednesday, February 27, 2019

POLITICS:FDA Is Exploring ‘Alternative Approaches’ To CBD Regulation, Commissioner Says



Published 1 day ago
on February 26, 2019

Cannabis Investing Q&A: Which Exchange Is Right for You?

Saturday, February 23, 2018
Q&A: Which Exchange Is Right for You?
By Greg Miller

Welcome to another edition of our member Q&A. We may have had a short week thanks to Presidents' Day, but that hasn't kept you from writing in with questions.

And we love that. The National Institute for Cannabis Investors is your service, and the more you participate, the better that service is for everyone.

So keep the questions coming!
In the meantime, here are the answers to some of your questions from the past week.
Paul W. asks: "If a stock originated in Canada and is also on the American exchange, is there an advantage to buy from one exchange over the other?‍"

No. And I really appreciate this question, Paul, because the answer was "yes" not all that long ago - at least for OTC-listed stocks. So I'm pleased to be able to bring our fellow members some new information. 

If a stock is listed on an American exchange such as the NYSE or the Nasdaq you can count on good liquidity in the stock and all the rights of a home listing, including the right to vote on corporate matters and full participation in rights and warrant offerings. Holding a U.S.-listed foreign stock is just as good as holding the stock on its "home" exchange.

Now, there used to be a difference between a foreign-listed stock and its equivalent on the U.S. over-the-counter (non-exchange) market. The U.S. stock used to be less liquid, which means you'd generally have to pay more to buy the stock, and you'd get less when you sold. But even that is not true for cannabis stock any more - the foreign exchanges work closely with U.S. OTC market-makers to ensure that the OTC listing tracks the foreign listing as closely as possible. 
So you can buy a cannabis stock in the U.S. or on its "home" exchange with confidence, but do note that for the purposes of our model portfolios, we will mostly be paying attention to the U.S. versions of the stock, so our buy and sell recommendations willprimarily come from there.

In a related question, Charles K. asks: "Are you waiting until the Canadian cannabis stocks trading on the CSE and the TSX are also traded on the OTCBB before you send recommendations to buy? If so, what about the IPOs?"

This is a great question, and it's of particular importance for members of The Cannabis IPO Insider. A lot of U.S. investors have difficulty buying stocks from the CSE and the TSXV, particularly when the stocks are newly issued, and particularly when the underlying company is based in the United States. So I generally wait until there is a U.S. version of the stock traded over the counter before recommending it if it is an American company.

The question here is whether I do the same thing for Canadian-based stocks. The answer is usually yes. What I've been finding is that because of the additional difficulties buying newly issued stocks from the CSE and TSXV, stocks have difficulty gaining tractionuntil that U.S. version is available - it opens the stock up to a much larger pool of potential buyers. This is mostly true of Canadian companies as well as U.S. ones, so I usually wait.

There may be a case when I don't wait - I'm constantly talking to investment bankers, brokers, market makers and even the exchanges themselves, so I get a pretty good idea of how demand is going to shake out. If I think a stock will rise drastically on its IPO before its U.S. symbol is available, you can be sure I'll recommend it for those people who are able to purchase it. 

Angelika J. and Wayne K. both want to know: "How can I access the 'Vault'?"

When we talk about the "Vault," we're referring to the NICILytics database. I'm glad you asked about this, because I'd love to share a bit about why we felt this database was so important to build.
When the NICI team started to look for the best cannabis companies in the world to recommend to our subscribers, we were shocked at the poor state of information about the companies in the industry. 

Often, even very basic information like the company's name, its lines of business, even its number of shares was just wrong on every platform we looked at. Not just the free ones likeYahoo! Finance or the information platform that comes with your online brokerage account, but sources like Bloomberg, which cost thousands of dollars per month!
And that's why we created our own. NICILytics is easily the most comprehensive database of cannabis companies on the planet. It includes every publicly traded cannabis company, a number of companies planning on going public soon, and a lot of extremely promising new startups. All of these companies haveundergone our comprehensive vetting process. 

They've all been rated on our simple 1-5 scale. If you want to see all the cannabis tech stocks, or the medical firms, or the up-and-coming brands - you can sort this database by market sector. Or, if you want to find just the best of the best, you can sort by rating.

So if you want, you can find every single company we've rated a 5 - a strong buy. Any one of these companies could be our next monthly recommendation, and by accessing the NICILytics database, you can discover them before the rest of our members.
You can gain access to NICILytics by becoming a Lifetime Member of Cannabis Investor's Report. If you're already a Lifetime Member, click here to begin exploring the database now.
Enjoy your weekend, and we'll be back next week with much more about the cannabis markets.
Thanks for being an important part of the National Institute for Cannabis Investors,
Greg Miller
Executive Director, National Institute for Cannabis Investors
•••
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•••
Nothing in this email should be considered personalized financial advice. Although our employees may answer your general customer service questions, they are not licensed under securities laws to address your particular investment situation. No communication by our employees to you should be deemed as personalized financial advice.
We expressly forbid our writers from having a financial interest in any security recommended to our readers. All of our employees and agents must wait 24 hours after on-line publication or 72 hours after the mailing of printed-only publication prior to following an initial recommendation.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Gurus of Pesticide Residue Analysis


Why I changed my mind on weed by Dr. Sanjay Gupta


By Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN Chief Medical Correspondent
Updated at 8:44 PM ET, Thu August 8, 2013

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Dr. Sanjay Gupta says we have been "systematically misled" on marijuana
  • DEA lists marijuana as a schedule 1 substance with "high potential for abuse"
  • Most recent research on marijuana has been on its negative effects, Gupta says
  • Studies on marijuana require approval from National Institute on Drug Abuse

Saturday, February 23, 2019

CANNABIS AROUND THE WORLD: U.S.- CA’s use of National Guard to target illegal marijuana grows fuels questions, concerns over potential MJ industry fallout

CA’s use of National Guard to target illegal marijuana grows fuels questions, concerns over potential MJ industry fallout

Legal marijuana companies are cautiously welcoming California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s announcement that 150 National Guard troops will deploy to Northern California to “go after illegal cannabis farms,” but the news also is kindling fears in some industry circles of a renewed, government-led drug war.
Many legal marijuana companies have long argued that illicit operators pose a major threat to their bottom line – and a widespread law enforcement conundrum for the state at large.
However, some of California’s legal cannabis companies remain unclear about how the National Guard effort will proceed, and the state has yet to offer clear-cut answers.
Parallels drawn to the decades-old Campaign Against Marijuana Planting program (CAMP) have some worried about a “drug war 2.0” because in years past, CAMP arguably victimized many of the same MJ farmers who are now legal and licensed.
Cannabis companies also are looking for clarity from the state about how the deployment will be managed to ensure it doesn’t unintentionally interfere with legal marijuana businesses.
It’s also unclear whether the deployment may lead to raids on some farms that may be out of compliance with state industry rules but are still transitioning and trying to become part of the legal market.
Memories of CAMP, in particular, are triggering alarms.
  • “CAMP … sends shivers up my spine just hearing it,” said John Brower, a cannabis industry consultant in Trinity County, which comprises the Emerald Triangle along with Humboldt and Mendocino counties.
    National Guard troops are already involved in at least two anti-narcotics efforts: CAMP, as well as the National Guard’s Counterdrug Task Force (CDTF).
    CAMP is a joint program involving 10 state and federal agencies, including the California National Guard. It’s separate from the CDTF.
    While the order that Newsom signed last week bolstered Guard personnel for the CDTF, Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal called the move a “carryover of the ‘CAMP’ program.”
    The state attorney general’s office announced 52 arrests last October made via CAMP in connection with illegal marijuana grows across California.
    Honsal’s comments tying the new National Guard effort to CAMP raised eyebrows in the legal Northern California MJ farming community.
  • Scars left by CAMP
  • National Guard troops are already involved in at least two anti-narcotics efforts: CAMP, as well as the National Guard’s Counterdrug Task Force (CDTF).
    CAMP is a joint program involving 10 state and federal agencies, including the California National Guard. It’s separate from the CDTF.
    While the order that Newsom signed last week bolstered Guard personnel for the CDTF, Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal called the move a “carryover of the ‘CAMP’ program.”
    The state attorney general’s office announced 52 arrests last October made via CAMP in connection with illegal marijuana grows across California.
    Honsal’s comments tying the new National Guard effort to CAMP raised eyebrows in the legal Northern California MJ farming community.
    Growers there support enforcement against violent gangs and “trespass grows” on public lands – but the reference carries mental scars from years of “abusive” raids by CAMP agents.
    “Abusive” is a word multiple sources used to describe CAMP’s heyday from 1983 to the early 2000s.
    “The abuses of the CAMP program have left some long-lasting wounds in our community, and those wounds aren’t all healed,” Brower said.
    The mission is unclear
    Asked to clarify the new CDTF mission’s scope, Newsom’s press office referred Marijuana Business Daily to the initial news release, dated Feb. 11.
    Under Newsom’s order, troops assigned to the CDTF would focus on combating “transnational crime organizations engaged in the illegal trafficking of firearms and narcotics.”
    The order also noted that National Guard members assisted in the seizure of over 71,000 pounds of “illegal cannabis” in 2018.
    The governor’s office didn’t immediately answer follow-up questions – such as whether the CDTF would possibly raid unlicensed grows on private lands or only illegal “trespass grows” on public lands.

    The 150 new troops assigned to the new mission represent a roughly 75% increase in personnel for the CDTF, which currently has “200-plus” soldiers and airmen, according to Lt. Col. Jonathan Shiroma, the California National Guard’s chief of media relations.
To read entire article, click HERE


CANNABIS AROUND THE WORLD: EU resolution’s medical cannabis definition too restrictive, experts say

EU resolution’s medical cannabis definition too restrictive, experts say

Much of resolution 2018/2775(RSP) focuses on research, medical education and health insurance coverage, but some of the components – Article 14 in particular – have created concern around “protecting the interest of some manufacturers,” Balas noted.
A look at Article 14
Article 14 lays the foundation for what the European Parliament is calling medical cannabis:
(Article 14) calls on the Commission to work with Member States to ensure that safe and controlled cannabis used for medicinal purposes can only be in the form of cannabis-derived products that have gone through clinical trials, regulatory assessment and approval.
This restrictive definition was proposed “to ensure that cannabis-based medicines which have undergone clinical trials are readily available to all EU doctors and patients, but access to medical cannabis not supported by clinical trials be decided on a national level,” United Kingdom MEP Catherine Bearder told Marijuana Business Daily. 
“Legalization of cannabis for whatever reason is a national issue and isn’t a legal competency of the EU,” said Bearder, whose Liberal Democrat party supports fully legalizing cannabis and introducing a properly regulated market in the U.K.
Each country is still responsible for passing specific legislation regarding legalization, and the resolution is not binding on member states, which means each country could opt for broader definitions than those proposed by this resolution.

Friday, February 22, 2019

LEGAL: Voting guide to legalize marijuana in your state




Simply choose your state from the provided list OR enter your zip code to search

LEGAL Cannabis: NORML Grades 2020 Presidential Candidates

1 in 5 reduce OPIATE use due to cannabis being substituted or supplemente

Introduction
There is a substantial growth in the use of medical cannabis in recent years and with the aging of the population, medical cannabis is increasingly used by the elderly. We aimed to assess the characteristics of elderly people using medical cannabis and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the treatment

1 in 5 reduce OPIATE use due to cannabis being substituted or supplemented.

Methods
A prospective study that included all patients above 65 years of age who received medical cannabis from January 2015 to October 2017 in a specialized medical cannabis clinic and were willing to answer the initial questionnaire. Outcomes were pain intensity, quality of life and adverse events at six months.

Results
During the study period, 2736 patients above 65 years of age began cannabis treatment and answered the initial questionnaire. The mean age was 74.5 ± 7.5 years. The most common indications for cannabis treatment were pain (66.6%) and cancer (60.8%). After six months of treatment, 93.7% of the respondents reported improvement in their condition and the reported pain level was reduced from a median of 8 on a scale of 0–10 to a median of 4. Most common adverse events were: dizziness (9.7%) and dry mouth (7.1%). After six months, 18.1% stopped using opioid analgesics or reduced their dose.

Conclusion
Our study finds that the therapeutic use of cannabis is safe and efficacious in the elderly population. Cannabis use may decrease the use of other prescription medicines, including opioids. Gathering more evidence-based data, including data from double-blind randomized-controlled trials, in this special population is imperative.

Highlights

The most common indications for cannabis in the elderly were pain and cancer.


At six months of cannabis treatment, 93.7% reported improvement in their condition.


At six months of treatment, the number of reported falls was significantly reduced.


Medical cannabis decreased the use of prescription medicines, including opioids.

Epidemiological characteristics, safety and efficacy of medical cannabis in the elderly

Published Online: February 02, 2018


SPECIAL EDITION: HELP! What to Do If Your Dog Ate Weed? First Response Guide

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